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The Dressmaker – Marion Boyce, Margot Wilson

Florence Foster Jenkins – Consolata Boyle

Hail, Caesar! – Mary Zophres

Hidden Figures – Renee Ehrlich Kalfus

Jackie – Madeline Fontaine

 



 
Photos by:Amazon

The Dressmaker – Marion Boyce, Margot Wilson

Margot Wilson
The challenge for me was to ensure that Tilly looked separate from the rest of the cast both when she was in her everyday wear and when she was looking glamorous. This also included colours and fabrics. Keeping Tilly looking different was inspired from her years working in France and motivated by her actions in the script.

Marion Boyce
The biggest challenge was designing ensembles that took inspiration from the harsh landscape and exploring the inner peacock of the characters to enrich and empower the wearer, whilst using fashion as a beautiful weapon.

 


 
Photos by:Nick Wall/Paramount Picture

Florence Foster Jenkins – Consolata Boyle

ACD Rosie Grant

One of the challenges on Florence Foster Jenkins was the lack of contrast between Florence’s performance and daywear costumes: both were as decorative and fanciful as the other. Her personal world was an act of the imagination, which she put together to protect herself from a number of harsh realities. Our first glimpseof Florence is of her being lowered from the ceiling of the Commodore Hotel, with all her methods of theatrical communication in evidence, as the “ Angel of Inspiration” : white gown, pouf hat, enormous wings, suspended on a harness strapped to her padding, and “ playing” on a golden harp. However, without the wings and harp (or maybe even with them) Florence could have easily drifted straight into a social evening with her Verdi ladies.

 


 
Photos by:Universal Pictures

Hail, Caesar! – Mary Zophres

ACD Jo Kissack

I absolutely loved designing Hail, Caesar! mostly because I was able to design costumes that I had never attempted before. The water sequence, for instance, was thrilling and scary at the same time. I wanted Scarlett’s Mermaid costume to be beautiful, hand-beaded, and to have movement, but we also had to make sure Scarlett could actually swim in it! We didn’t have access to the tank nor did we have a camera test. I was really happy with the mermaid and the two-color synchronized swimsuits, but I never saw them swimming together until the camera rolled—and that moment was really exciting. There were a lot of firsts for me on Hail, Caesar!: Romans soldiers and senators, dancing sailors, Israelites and slaves, Technicolor gowns and twins, and they were all a thrill.

 


 
Photos by:20th Century Fox

Hidden Figures – Renee Ehrlich Kalfus

ACD Paula Elins

What’s unusual about Hidden Figures is that it’s such an inspiring true story that is largely unknown. The film tells the story of three genius female African American mathematicians, who were instrumental in getting the United States into space in the early 1960s.They were the heroes of that time that no one ever heard of. That opened up freedom in our storytelling to look at the period and that moment in history (with its defining civil rights battles and the space race) with a fresh eye.

We decided early on to create a strict color palette that mirrored the reality of segregation at NASA where the story takes place. The female African American mathematicians worked in a segregated area called the west wing—which I drenched in rich jewel tone color and texture. As a contrast, a mile away in the task force room, the all-white male mathematicians were monochromatically dressed in white shirts, skinny ties, and grey pants. When Katherine (Taraji P. Hensen) gets promoted, the contrasting color palette gives you a stunning visual impact.


 
Photos by:Fox Searchlight Pictures

Jackie – Madeline Fontaine

Not available at time of press.


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