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Doctor Strange – Alexandra Byrne

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them – Colleen Atwood

Kubo and the Two Strings – Deborah Cook

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children – Colleen Atwood

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story – David Crossman, Glyn Dillon

 



 
Photos by:Walt Disney Studios

Doctor Strange – Alexandra Byrne

Doctor Strange is my fifth project with Marvel and by now I know their scale and system of work. But the intriguing thing is that no two projects are the same… each brings new and unpredictable challenges. The early graphic novels are brilliantly illustrated by Steve Ditko, creating an extraordinary psychedelic world. I realized that one of the challenges would be to strike a balance between portraying the magic on the screenand maintaining the integrity of our character’s clothes, whilst simultaneously counterbalancing the dramatic VFX imagery. The Cloak of Levitation is several things at once—it’s a magical artifact, a familiar to Strange, a sentient character in its own right, and a piece of clothing. Just as in reading the comic books, we are drawn into the characters and the world of magic. I wanted the costumes to draw in the audience, carrying acredibility that allows the eye to rest and discover layers of detail whilst embedded in the world of Strange.

 


 
Photos by:Warner Bros. Pictures

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them – Colleen Atwood

ACD Christine Cantella ILL Warren Holder

Fantastic Beasts is a giant period movie, with the most amazing sets ever. Along with characters who were Magical, it was really interesting while filming to think of all the beasts we were seeing along with the action and color of the real world. Researching the great melting pot of NYC in 1924 for the film was fascinating.My team and I had massive fittings to achieve the texture needed to bring the citizens of old New York alive. Like all films, it begins with the screenplay and the director. I was so lucky to be able to help achieve the vision that these two people had created in their mind.

 



Photos by:Focus Features

Kubo and the Two Strings – Deborah Cook

My costume designs for Kubo and the Two Strings were created for an imaginary period in a fantastical Japan. Two distinct characteristics for these costumes were to create close-fitting garments tailored to our character’s bodies and to create them in miniature. Our director Travis Knight’s formidable vision was to tell an ambitiously layered story.This required that each character be completely identifiable with a striking silhouette. For authenticity, my extensive research ranged from the Jōmon through Heian and Meiji to Edo eras. Visiting Japan fueled our love of Japanese culture and the films that have inspired our own animation industry. We had to devise a way to tailor graphic movements into the costume with complex engineering understructures that are woven into the actual armature structure.Making sleeves and trains flow with gravity was a huge undertaking.

 



Photos by:20th Century Fox

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children – Colleen Atwood

ACD Christine Cantella ILL Warren Holder

Miss Peregrine was a special project as we had two periods as well as a fantasy element. I was in good hands with Tim [Burton], whoexplained what feeling he wanted from the characters and the need to believe it’s all real and possible.The thing that happens when you are doing this kind of movie is the fantasy element just becomes part of the design.The clothes of the children and Eva, Judy, and the Hollows were of the period, but with a different, almost illustrated feeling,to get the effect of an old illustration, which was a new challenge for me.


 
Photos by:Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story – David Crossman, Glyn Dillon

ACDs Stella Atkinson, Samantha Keeble ILL Adam Brockbank

Glyn Dillon
For Rogue One we made around seven hundred costumes in total. I think it’s safe to say that just as much work went into our background characters as the primary characters, because every Star Wars background character can achieve immortality. They become toys, trading cards, have a comic book, or even an entire feature film devoted to them. So there’s really no time let up—every costume has to cut the mustard.

David Crossman
I think something that made designing for Rogue One unique, was the opportunity to add new looks and characters to a universe that has existed for all of us for forty years—wanting to do costumes that felt right within the world, but had a relevance for modern audiences. It was something that we were
always aware of and always gave us a great degree of satisfaction, when our new additions complimented the world so entrenched in people’s minds.


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