Logo-Black-CDGA2017

Click the heading below to read the related articles

The Crown – Michele Clapton

Penny Dreadful – Gabriella Pescucci

Stranger Things, Series – Kimberly Adams, Malgosia Turzanska

Westworld, Pilot – Trish Summerville

Westworld, Series – Ane Crabtree

 



 
Photos by:Netflix

The Crown – Michele Clapton

The process of Costume Design on The Crown was unique for me in that I was dealing with a family that is known to almost everyone worldwide, and almost everyone has their polarized view of them. I therefore feltit was essential to accurately portray the key public costumes in great detail, the wedding and coronation in particular. By doing so, I hoped to secure belief in my artistic interpretation of their private looks. These for me were by far the most interesting and creative elements of the show, in order to try to explore the often-vulnerable humans behind the royal facade.

 


 
Photos by:Showtime

Penny Dreadful – Gabriella Pescucci

The texture is very important for my job and through the last years is very difficult. This is also because how they shoot. It’s not only costume. I think is interesting because all the characters are dressed period, but the style of the shooting is very contemporary. And this is beautiful. It’s not like maybe like fixed camera. It’s casual, how they shoot the movies now. Even if you see the detail, not too pretty, but it’s strong. That is interesting, I think. I tried for Eva to take away all the decoration that like we don’t need it, the old—just getting very severe, clear. Not many ribbons, not laces, I take off everything. I try to clean it, just to clean the period. I pay more attention to the form, to the shape, and less of the details. Just sometimes a few. Thedress should help with the actor to become what she needs to be. Costume and makeup is the first step that an actor usus to get into the character.

 


 
Photos by:Netflix

Stranger Things, Series – Kimberly Adams, Malgosia Turzanska

Kimberly Adams
I fell in love with the story, and after meeting with the Duffers, was so excited about the characters and their vision. They wanted real characters and not the campy 80s people remember. I immediately started watching films of the period, as well as pouring through real family photos from the Midwest, and my favorite yearbook website where you can search books by year/state/city! You see lots of those yearbook photos in my mood boards I created for the season, as we had seven of the scripts up front!

The biggest challenge was kids period clothing and having so many different age ranges in the show. Plus, needing multiples and taking into account they would be growing over five months. The fit of clothing in this time period is not the same as most kids clothing today, so we had to build and age a lot of the clothes for all the boys, as well as Eleven. It was like doing a mini-Narnia movie… but faster!

Malgosia Turzanska
I loved so much about the project. The kids were amazing and shaping their characters, which gradually gained complexity and texture as the season progressed, was particularly enjoyable. We were also constantly switching shoe sizes and inseams, as they were growing throughout the show, as the Polish saying says, “ like mushroom after the rain.”

Also, showing Nancy shift from the naiveté and romanticism of the girlish pastels and malleable fabrics to a stronger palette and a more defined silhouette of a young woman was a blast. The upside down suits proved to be a bit of a challenge in a practical sense, as it was difficult to move through the woods in the bulky moonboots, and see in the darkness through the fogging visors, so we were constantly coming up with innovations and solutions that made them work without sacrificing the look.

 


 
Photos by:HBO

Westworld, Pilot – Trish Summerville

ACD Jo Kissack, ILL Phillip Boutté Jr

Designing the Westworld pilot was such a creatively fulfilling project. I really enjoyed being able to design within completely different worlds and time frames for the same show. The town of Sweetwater is a Wild West amusement park of sorts, where the characters are to be classic and recognizable to the “ visitors” and to the audience. Most of the robots and some of the “visitors” wear the same costumes throughout many of the episodes. The intention was to keep the audience guessing who was human, and who was a robot. The Delos offices, labs, and surgical basements that are filled with humans performing diagnostics on robots, all have a very cold, technical feel. I used cold colors and clean sharp shapes, latex surgical gowns of blood red and white, and black lab coats with shiny patent trim. I think the biggest challenge was designing costumes that the actors/characters would wear for many episodes and not lose interest. Somewhat like characters at Disneyland a very dark, twisted Disneyland.

 

 
Photos by:HBO

Westworld, Series – Ane Crabtree

ACD Amy Parris

The beautiful thing that made Westworld unique was that by its very nature, it was a world on a whole new level. Shooting in the desert had its challenges, with extreme weather, poisonous animals, and insects. The scope of the project was so large that the amount of clothing for the principals and extras, made to measure for the principals, day players, and stunt performers, combined with the action involved, created a costume factory in this historical locale that felt akin to fantasy. All of the creatives on this show and the whole of my costume department were consistently raising the bar. It was lovely and unique to feel and experience the collective energy of excellence.


User ID


Password




I forgot my user id/password